Mount Canobolas, as pictured bottom of page, is the highest point in New South Wales west of the Great Dividing Range, and within stones throw of one of our good customers, Western New South Wales Health District, Orange offices.  The top of the mountain is now dominated by numerous towers used for television and radio transmissions across large areas of central New South Wales. These transmitters include towers for Airservices Australia, Royal Australian Air Force, Prime Television, WIN Television, Australian Broadcasting Corporation and Southern Cross Ten.  Try to locate the Mt Canobolas region in a Power BI Maps however, and we start to need more than just postcodes to fill our map data.   So here comes Shape Maps for Power BI…

ShapeMapOptions

Power BI July 2016 release adds Shape Map fruit, Query Parameters, candy for the R enthusiasts to name a few, and my favourite, Table Style Formatting, but check it all out in this video coverage of the latest release with American voices.
[youtube height=”HEIGHT” width=”WIDTH”]You Beaut Shape Maps[/youtube]TableStyles

Remember to add your Shape in Power BI as outlined here https://powerbi.microsoft.com/en-us/documentation/powerbi-
desktop-shape-map/ ShapeMapVizby going to Options in Power BI desktop, select Preview Features, then Enable the Shape Map Preview.  You will have to restart Power BI of course, then you will see the guy (or girl) here in the lower right of the Visualizations pane.

For us Aussies the standard Australian States appear but anything lower granularity, like Local Government Areas, you will need to grab the TopoJSON map as covered here https://powerbi.microsoft.com/en-us/documentation/powerbi-desktop-shape-map/.  If you can’t find your JSON maps, use this no frills converter tool http://mapshaper.org

canolbolaslandscape

 

 

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